The following Conditions are related to Na

Select a specific condition below to view its details.

  • Aldosteronism

    The condition is usually manifested with low potassium levels and high blood pressure in the blood. Anyone can develop aldosteronism. There are certain risk factors that make an individual more susceptible to the condition, including If the person is already being treated with three or more medications for hypertension. Patients who have a family history of Aldosteronism When the person has Hypokalemia (Low p  Read More

  • Colitis, ulcerative

    Most people with ulcerative colitis have mild to moderate symptoms. The course of ulcerative colitis may vary, with some people having long periods of remission. Types Doctors often classify ulcerative colitis according to its location. Types of ulcerative colitis include: Ulcerative proctitis. Inflammation is confined to the area closest to the anus (rectum), and rectal bleeding may be the only sign of the disea  Read More

  • Cystic disease of the renal medulla

    The risk factors for the cystic disease of the renal medulla include: Age - It seems like people who are older are more likely to get this disease. Gender - Men seem to be more likely to get it than women. Race - People of Asian descent are more likely to get it than people of other races. Family history - If your family has a history of cystic disease of the renal medulla or other diseases like it,  Read More

  • Diabetes (type 1 and type 2)

    Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sore  Read More

  • Diabetes and foot problems

    Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. People with diabetes have an increased risk of ulcers and damage to the feet. A number of different kinds of foot problems can occur in people with diabetes. These include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal i  Read More

  • Diabetes insipidus

    There is currently no cure for diabetes insipidus, but certain treatments can be done to relieve your thirst and decrease the urge to urinate. There are four forms of this disorder: Central diabetes insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus Gestational diabetes insipidus Primary polydipsia Hormone therapy Low-salt diet Drink more water Desmopressin Ch  Read More

  • Diabetes, type 2

    Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can be living with type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. When signs and symptoms are present, they may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unintended weight loss Fatigue Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections Numbness or tingling in  Read More

  • Diabetic bearded woman syndrome

    The actual cause of this disorder is still not clear, but there are some risk factors doctors and researchers have noted that can lead to diabetic bearded woman syndrome- In almost 50% of these cases, it is a genetic transmission. Obesity might be a risk factor that develops this syndrome in the older days. This syndrome is seen particularly in postmenopausal women, so it is important for every woman to take  Read More

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (dka)

    The treatments which are currently prescribed for KDA are- Fluid Replacement: Depending on your situation, you will receive fluids to help you rehydrate. This is done to replenish the fluids lost through excessive urination while also helping dilute the excess sugar in your blood. Electrolyte Replacement Therapy: As you may already be aware, electrolytes are minerals found in your blood, like sodium, potassium, and chl  Read More

  • G6pd deficiency

    The majority of people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency do not require treatment. They should, however, be told to avoid drugs and things that cause oxidant stress. Patients should avoid broad beans as well (i.e., fava beans). As long as certain foods and drugs are avoided, most children with G6PD deficiency lead completely normal lives.  Read More

  • Gestational diabetes

    Medication and Treatment: The doctor suggests some treatments for blood sugar level checking and common medicines like Insulin. • Stay Active: Great prenatal yoga and light exercise are available to stay body active.• Eat Healthily: It's significant to have healthy foods to maintain blood sugar levels. Tests are very much necessary because there are no symptoms of Gestational Diabetes.  Read More

  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome (hus)

    Signs and symptoms of HUS can include: Bloody diarrhea Decreased urination or blood in the urine Abdominal pain, vomiting and occasionally fever Pallor Small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth Fatigue and irritability Confusion or seizures High blood pressure Swelling of the face, hands, feet or entire body When  Read More

  • Hepatorenal syndrome (hrs)

    Currently, the only curative therapy for patients with hepatorenal syndrome is a liver transplant, which treats both liver diseases and associated impaired renal functions. However, even after the liver transplantation, the treated patients have lower chances of recovering from their kidney disease. Liver Transplantation – It is one of the best treatments for HRS, but it's not an optimal option for people with HRS-1, who a  Read More

  • Hyperglycemia

    Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars.  Read More

  • Insulin resistance

      Medications – Certain drugs such as Metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet) will be prescribed to keep the blood sugar level in check. In some cases, blood pressure medications and statins reduce the level of LDL cholesterol in the blood. Diet changes – Consuming a nutrient-rich and moderate carbohydrate diet including nuts, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and more will reduce the risk of dev  Read More

  • Juxtaglomerular hyperplasia

    Juxtaglomerular hyperplasia is a new syndrome characterized by hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus of the kidneys, aldosteronism that results from adrenal cortical hyperplasia, and consistently normal blood pressure. Here, the aldosterone is overproduced, which has a strong impairment of urinary concentration ability. In this condition, the circulating angiotensin starts getting increasi  Read More

  • Kidney agenesis

    There is no cure for kidney agenesis currently, but babies with this condition can normally live with a few limitations in lifestyle. Babies with URA should avoid getting their remaining kidneys injured or damaged and avoid playing sports when they are older. Once a patient is diagnosed with URA, they should get their urine, BP, and blood tested every year to check if any kidney problem has arised or not. In  Read More

  • Kidney disease of diabetes

    The initial step in treating diabetic nephropathy is controlling the sugar level/diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension). Diet, lifestyle changes, exercise, and prescription medications can help control diabetes. Proper management of your blood sugar and hypertension, can help prevent or delay kidney dysfunction and other complications. However, if you are already affected by diabetic nephropathy, you  Read More

  • Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus ...

    Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can be living with type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. When signs and symptoms are present, they may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unintended weight loss Fatigue Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections Numbness or tingling in  Read More

  • Nondiabetic glycosuria

    Normally, the body excretes glucose in the urine only when there is an excess glucose level in the blood.In healthy people, the glucose will be completely reabsorbed into the blood after filtration.However, in patients affected by Non-diabetic Glycosuia, the glucose may not be completely reabsorbed by the condition but will be excreted in the urine, despite the blood glucose level being in its healthy rang  Read More

  • Type 1 diabetes

    Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bed-wetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision When to see a doctor Consult you  Read More

  • Type 2 diabetes

    No cure has yet been found for this condition. But you can regulate the sugar levels in your body with the help of some lifestyle changes such as: Regular exercise Losing weight Balanced diet Quit smoking and alcohol consumption Nutrition Counseling Diabetic Diet Statin - Decreases the level of harmful cholesterol produced in the liver Insulin - Regulates adeq  Read More

  • Vasopressin-resistant diabetes insipidus

    Vasopressin-resistant diabetes insipidus or Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (NDI) is a rare kidney disorder. It causes them to malfunction, causing the body to lose too much water. It occurs when the body's response to the hormone vasopressin fails. Depending on the hormone level or the severity of the symptoms, this condition can be mild or severe. This condition can be inherited or acquired. Symptoms of hereditary NDI may app  Read More